Our Newsletter

Prenatal alcohol exposure alters development of brain function: Neural basis for symptoms of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

Date: August 4, 2014 Source: Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Saban Research Institute Summary: Medical researchers have found that children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) showed weaker brain activation during specific cognitive tasks than their unaffected counterparts.         

In the first study of its kind, Prapti Gautam,

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Pubertal Hormones and Brain Volume in Adolescents

Human Brain Mapping has published an article by Megan Herting, Prapti Gautam, Jeffrey Spielberg, Eric Kan, Ronald Dahl, and Elizabeth Sowell (2014) on the role of testosterone and estradiol in brain volume changes across adolescence. This longitudinal study uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to examine subcortical brain volume in adolescent boys and girls. For

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Reading Skill and Structural Brain Development

Our very own Suzanne Houston and colleagues have recently published a paper featured on the cover of Neuroreport. This paper discusses changes in the brain and their association with performance on reading measures. The abstract can be found on pubmed and by following this link: Reading skill and structural brain development.

Our Own Dr. Sowell is Quoted in The New York Times!

Puberty Before Age 10: A New ‘Normal’?

One day last year when her daughter, Ainsley, was 9, Tracee Sioux pulled her out of her elementary school in Fort Collins, Colo., and drove her an hour south, to Longmont, in hopes of finding a satisfying reason that Ainsley began growing pubic hair at age 6. Ainsley

Read More On Our Own Dr. Sowell is Quoted in The New York Times!

Suzanne Houston, Ph.D. Student in the DCNL was quoted in the Guardian

Suzanne Houston, of the University of Southern California, showed that the size of different parts of the brain could be affected by growing up in different homes. “We found higher parent education, smaller amygdala. The higher the income, the larger the hippocampus.”

The overall size of brain regions was not of primary significance, she said,

Read More On Suzanne Houston, Ph.D. Student in the DCNL was quoted in the Guardian

Elizabeth Sowell, Ph.D. Quoted in the Wasington Post

Does a parent’s education and income affect how a child’s brain develops? By Janice D’Arcy

Among the studies showing correlations between a child’s early home environment and later brain development that were presented this week at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscientists, one stood out as particularly startling.

It was the analysis that

Read More On Elizabeth Sowell, Ph.D. Quoted in the Wasington Post